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Create a Daily Writing Habit: 4 Reasons You Need a Writing Routine Today

There is not a one-size-fits-all approach to writing – what works for one writer may not work for the next. With all the techniques and tips and advice you may get from me, another blogger, or Stephen King himself, YOU are the only one who can decide what works best for YOU. 

Now, while the specifics may vary wildly from person to person, the fact that you need a writing routine of some kind still holds true, whether you’re writing short stories in your spare time, or blogging for a living. You can create a routine in the form of a schedule (blocking out specific times each day) or a general plan (setting a word or page count for the day), but the most important factor is that you create a routine that’s doable and works for you – something you can stick to day in and day out. 

With that in mind, building and sticking to a routine or daily writing habit will help build your self-discipline which will help you stick to your routine which will help build your self-discipline…and so on. It’s cyclical. So while it may be difficult in the beginning, I promise it will get easier with time!

Read on for 4 reasons I recommend a writing routine to EVERY writer.

Related: 8 Tips for Creating Your Own Writing Routine


1. Reach your goals

It may seem obvious, but if you have any goals as a writer (to write a book, finish a short story, blog every week for a year, etc) then you need to write regularly and consistently to meet those goals. Reaching goals of any kind becomes much more challenging without a game plan, and most people give up when they don’t know how to move forward. 

When you have a clear goal in mind and then work backwards, creating smaller, daily steps to lead you down your path to success, you drastically increase your chances of attaining your goals. 


2. Learn to prioritize your writing

Our time is one of our most precious commodities, and one of life’s greatest challenges is deciding what to give our time to – what’s worth it versus what’s not.

When you carve out time in your daily life specifically for writing, you’re making a statement that you value your writing and where it’s taking you. As a result, it becomes easier to spend more time on your writing and let other distractions go. 

Keeping in mind the value of your time, it’s likely that you’ll need to make sacrifices to develop a daily routine. If the sacrifices start piling up, or you’re sacrificing things that you’d rather not, you may need to reevaluate your writing goals and create a routine that’s more manageable and in-line with your priorities.


3. Keep your brain in a constant state of “writing”

You might call this your writing zone – I like to think of it as a state or frame of mind because you can hover in this state even when you’re not actively writing. When you spend a consistent amount of time writing and keeping your brain in a writing state, you’re training yourself to stay there longer, and fall back into it more easily. 

Honestly, it’s like working out. You’re building up the “muscle” of your brain to work more efficiently and “burn” longer, so the effects continue even after your daily writing time is over. Make sense?

And then when it’s time to jump back into it the next day, you’ll find it’s easier to slip into that frame of mind because you haven’t fully left it. As a result, you’ll start recognizing ideas and inspiration in your everyday life – ideas and inspiration that have always been there, but needed a writer’s perspective to look beyond the surface and see them for what they are.


4. Write more to write more

Let me ask you a silly question – do you want MORE to write about? Do you want to know, definitively, that you will NEVER run out of things to say?

Then you need to write MORE. 

I know, it sounds counterintuitive, right? You may be thinking, if I write more, doesn’t that mean I’m depleting this finite reserve of ideas that I have stored somewhere? Don’t I need to save it up and spread it out strategically as I gather a few more ideas here and there throughout the years? 

Short answer – no! 

You are not working from a bucket of ideas – you’re working from a bottomless cavern. Not only can you lose great ideas in there by not taking them out, you have an infinite supply – you will not one day scrape bottom, throw up your hands, and have to give up writing for the rest of your days. The more you write, the more ideas will come to you. 

I love Elizabeth Gilbert’s take on creative ideas in her book “Big Magic” (if you’ve never read it, I highly recommend it). She talks about ideas having a consciousness – about how they search our world for willing humans to bring them into existence. Thinking in this way, if you prove yourself to be a willing, active participant in this exchange with ideas, more of them will seek you out. 

Now, I know, and Elizabeth Gilbert admits herself, this isn’t exactly a rational way of looking at things. But I challenge you to try a daily writing routine for at least 30 days and tell me this wasn’t true for you – that you ran out of ideas by the end, or that the mere act of writing didn’t generate more ideas for you. 

Related: The Stream of Consciousness Writing Technique & How to Use It

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HISTORY, PURPOSE AND USAGE

Lorem ipsum, or lipsum as it is sometimes known, is dummy text used in laying out print, graphic or web designs. The passage is attributed to an unknown typesetter in the 15th century who is thought to have scrambled parts of Cicero's De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum for use in a type specimen book. It usually begins with:

“Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.”

The purpose of lorem ipsum is to create a natural looking block of text (sentence, paragraph, page, etc.) that doesn't distract from the layout. A practice not without controversy, laying out pages with meaningless filler text can be very useful when the focus is meant to be on design, not content.

The passage experienced a surge in popularity during the 1960s when Letraset used it on their dry-transfer sheets, and again during the 90s as desktop publishers bundled the text with their software. Today it's seen all around the web; on templates, websites, and stock designs. Use our generator to get your own, or read on for the authoritative history of lorem ipsum.