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Poetry is magical. 

“Words picked from the ashes of a phoenix soul,
broken and burnt and reborn,
always reborn,
from pages splattered with inky tears
and the scribbled truths
of a crazed mind.

Words encapsulating pure emotion,
volatile,
unhindered and raw,
so easily transferred from heart to pen
and back again.

Words holding broken fragments of fragile souls
together,
connecting across continents,
screaming their secrets unto the world
for those who listen.

Words between words
assuring,
reassuring,
loving and reasoning,
reminding us all of us all;
reminding us that loneliness is the lie
that can’t win in the end
when we have poetry.”

— Alicia N Green


It can be soft and whimsical, teasing your hair with the barest breath of nostalgia, or it can slam into your chest, stealing the air from your lungs, leaving you gasping.

It can hurt. It can heal. 


And, as the poet Atticus puts it, “Poetry’s magic is that it is found when it’s needed.”

Poetry is about more than the words you’re reading. It’s about their aesthetic on the page, their order, their rhythm. It’s about how they make you feel, what they open your eyes to, and what’s being said between the lines. 


Poetry is all about encapsulating raw emotion into words in such a way that it’s released and felt with the soul every time it’s read.

The subtle art of ambiguity is one of poetry’s most magical qualities and what makes it so universal and relatable. To paint a picture with words is only one of the many responsibilities of a poem – it must paint that picture so it transforms based on the reader’s own perspective, drawing forth meanings that are different from person to person. 

None of this is the strict definition of poetry, but that’s kind of the point – poetry is so much more than its definition. 

Some believe poetry should always rhyme or follow specific structural guidelines. Many people believe we’re in an age that’s lost the art of “real poetry” altogether. But poetry is an art form, subject to transformation and evolution just like our own lives around us. To expect something like poetry to stay the same while everything else about our lives changes is irrational. 


Poetry holds within itself a reflection of the life of its creator – it changes with us.

The words poetry, poet, and poem are all derived from ancient Greek words meaning “to create,” “one who creates,” and “the thing created,” respectively. These meanings are even somewhat poetic – in a way, any creator is a poet, and everything created is poetry.

The dictionary definition states that poetry, or a poem, is a literary work that emphasizes emotion, written using the aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language, is usually metaphorical, and sometimes contains elements such as meter, rhyme, and stanzaic structure.

I’m sure you can appreciate the difficulty of defining something so complex. Poetry can be metaphorical, but doesn’t have to be. It can contain elements such as meter, rhyme, and a stanzaic structure, but it doesn’t have to.


Personally, my favorite definitions of poetry are poetic thoughts themselves:

“Poetry is emotion encapsulated in words, set to the rhythm of the soul.”

— Alicia N Green

“Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.”

— Robert Frost

“I would define, in brief, the poetry of words as the rhythmical creation of Beauty.”

— Edgar Allen Poe


In many ways, poetry is like beauty – it’s in the eye of the beholder, or in the soul of the reader.

It’s subjective. Determining the worth or value of a poem is something each individual must do for themselves. 

That said, there are qualities that can be agreed upon that make a poem good or better than others. 

Typically, good poems:

  • evoke an emotional response
  • give the reader something – a story, a moment, a message
  • use powerful imagery
  • don’t use clichés
  • use precisely chosen words
  • remain ambiguous without being unclear

Are you a poetry lover? A poet? New to poetry?

Get a FREE copy of my poetry e-book, an aesthetically designed labor of love featuring poems about love, life, and heartbreak.

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HISTORY, PURPOSE AND USAGE Testing 1

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HISTORY, PURPOSE AND USAGE

Lorem ipsum, or lipsum as it is sometimes known, is dummy text used in laying out print, graphic or web designs. The passage is attributed to an unknown typesetter in the 15th century who is thought to have scrambled parts of Cicero's De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum for use in a type specimen book. It usually begins with:

“Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.”

The purpose of lorem ipsum is to create a natural looking block of text (sentence, paragraph, page, etc.) that doesn't distract from the layout. A practice not without controversy, laying out pages with meaningless filler text can be very useful when the focus is meant to be on design, not content.

The passage experienced a surge in popularity during the 1960s when Letraset used it on their dry-transfer sheets, and again during the 90s as desktop publishers bundled the text with their software. Today it's seen all around the web; on templates, websites, and stock designs. Use our generator to get your own, or read on for the authoritative history of lorem ipsum.